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Cheese Tarts. A family food blog with hundreds of easy Chinese recipes, delicious Asian and Western cuisines for the home cook. Step-by-step photographs. Egg tarts are made from an outer pastry crust that is filled with egg custard and baked. Chinese egg tarts developed in Hong Kong from similar pastries. Apr 29, - Here's how to make yum cha style Egg Custard Tarts with flaky, buttery pastry and smooth custard. Get our recipe for Egg Custard Tarts. Dessert Cake RecipesDessert DrinksDessert BreadKinds Of DessertsAsian Hong Kong Style Egg Tarts 港式蛋挞 – Eat What Tonight - Dinner Recipe Lemon. Incredibly delicious, this Asian Honey-Sesame Salad Dressing goes so well with a myriad of salad ingredients and makes an amazing drizzling sauce.

Asian tarts

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Asian Tarts Video

Hokkaido Cheese Tart KP Kwan January 17, I am making these egg tarts for the first time and I Analcompilation that Janine xxx dough keeps Japanese massage blonde and the oil dough keeps getting exposed. When the water dough is Free safe sex videos out prior to adding the oil dough. Peter Ng March 4, Hi Francid, You can use the western method as mentioned, i. Mari December Gloryhole colorado, This pastry seems Girl sucks old mans cock be very versatile, can I put savory fillings in it?

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Recipes All. Experience All. Events All. Save to Journal. Save to Journal Print. Directions To Prep To prepare the water dough, place the flour, egg and salt in a food processor.

Pulse to form a crumb. Slowly add ice water until dough comes together to form a ball. Divide the dough in half, then wrap both dough balls in cling wrap.

Refrigerate for 30 mins. Pineapple Buns, a beloved Chinese bakery treat! Fragrant, buttery, melt-in-your-mouth pineapple tarts are even more delicious when made with home-made pineapple jam filling and the perfect sweet shortcrust pastry dough.

This recipe for pineapple buns is so easy and authentic, you'll be making this Chinese bakery classic at home in no time.

No specialty ingredients involved! In a food processor, pulse the flour, salt and butter until they resemble bread crumbs. With the motor running, add the yolk-water mixture and process until the dough starts to come together.

Pour out the contents and gently knead the dough to form a ball. I always remember as a child going for Dim Sum in Hong Kong and waiting for the trolley to come my way and the lady pushing the trolley to shout out Custard Tarts.

Of course, in the restaurant, you usually get 3 tarts on a plate. Gone in no time! Back then I was allowed to help with putting the filling in the tart cases and then watching them bake through the oven door.

I couldn't wait to eat them! The tarts are made up of a typical Chinese pastry, using very regular ingredients, which give the tarts that distinctive crisp texture and sweetness.

As for the filling; well! It's loaded with coconut as you would expect, and the setting agent we're using is an egg custard and some custard powder or Vanilla pudding powder, which acts as a thickener and also flavor.

When I baked these yesterday, the tarts didn't get a chance to go on the cooling rack. They were being eaten as fast as I could get them out of the pan.

So I hope you will enjoy these. Take a look here if you'd like to try a few more of our Chinese recipes. Use 6 Tablespoons for pastry and remaining, add to the filling 2 Cups or g All Purpose Flour, sieved.

These tarts are sweet, but not over sickly sweet. Make the pastry. In a mixing bowl, add the melted butter and powdered sugar and mix until combined.

The mixture will start to get thick so use 2 round-bladed knives and cut through until the mixture resembles lumps as in the photo. Stir until the butter has melted and the mixture starts to simmer.

Switch off the heat and add the coconut. Once the coconut filling has cooled, add the 4 beaten eggs PLUS the remainder left from the pastry.

Combine well then cover in plastic wrap and refrigerate for 30 minutes so it can firm up a little. Then roll out as thin as possible.

I divided my pastry into 2 batches so it was manageable on the worktop. This yielded 24 tarts. Butter the cupcake pan very well so the pastry does not stick when baking.

Place the tart discs into the cupcake pan and gently push down then take a fork and prick holes in the bottom of each pastry disc.

Take the filling from the fridge and give it a stir, then fill each cup with the mixture until nearly full.

Place in the oven for 15 minutes then switch off the oven and leave the door closed for 10 minutes. The tarts will continue to brown a little after the oven is off.

Then transfer on to a cooling rack. Serve warm or cold with a nice cup of tea! These tarts freeze very well so if you wanted to make a batch if there is only 2 of you at home, or indeed, make ahead for a party, these would be ideal.

Sometimes you can get these tarts in the Chinese bakeries with a glace sugared cherry on the top. If you wanted to do this, simply pop half a cherry in the center of each tart before baking.

We'd love to hear from you and what you thought of our post. Did you make any changes or add some other goodies? Let us know in the comments below.

Thanks for reading and happy cooking! These are a wonderful little tart, filled with a moist coconut egg custard filling. Great for the family and if you're making these for a party, be sure to make plenty!

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You can make the pastry in advance, portion it so that you do not need to defrost all and will affect the quality of the unused portion.

However, it may not be the best if you keep the baked tarts for too long. Instead of doing that, cut and place the pastry in the mold. Frozen the empty pastry shells.

This way can cut short your baking time next time. Hi Mike, I do not do that as it will not stick. However, please be careful while filling up the egg liquid.

The pastry will stick to the mold even if there is a drop of egg liquid spilled. When cooked, the egg will stick the pastry to the mold. I am currently attempting this recipe.

When making the oil dough, however, I have found that it seems like I have about 2 to 3 times more dough than is proportionate to the water dough.

When I watched your YouTube video, it seems like you only used a portion of the oil dough that your recipe calls for. I am wondering if there is supposed to be a lot of leftover oil dough, or if we should be putting all the oil dough into the water dough?

Hi Ivy, The water dough of the Chinese egg tart is based on g flour, and oil dough is g flour as in the recipe.

Roll out the water dough with two cling films. Use a spoon to scoop as much oil dough at the center of the water dough. Since the oil dough is very sticky, I only rely on my spoon, and not touching it with my hand.

As in the video, you will see some oil dough are still in the mixer. I leave it as it is as it is not possible to get all out from the mixer bowl.

This amount should be sufficient to create the layers in the pastry. It looks a lot and hard to wrap all inside. But be patient and seal all the oil dough inside the water dough.

Hope I manage to make it clear to you. Thanks, KP Kwan. Hi Ivy, Glad to know that the Chinese egg tarts turn out well.

Thanks for trying my recipe. Hi, I remember trying your recipe my first time making these egg tarts a few years ago, and they turned out perfectly!

The next two times I made them, I used a different recipe because I forgot which recipe I initially used, and the crust was never as flaky as when I used your recipe!

Thank you for putting so much detail into the recipe. It made a complex process possible for a beginner.

I will definitely make this again for my family! Sorry to bother you again. Thank you so much in advance. The method is a bit messy if you do not use the food processor, but it is nearly identical.

I suggest after cutting the butter, place it in a large stainless steel bowl. Wait until it becomes very soft before mixing with the flour.

Hand mix is challenging if the butter is still hard. The pastry is folded a few times later so it will be well mixed anyway. In other words, there is no need to mix until it looks like breadcrumbs, as making shortcrust pastry.

This is because of too much mixing and too long will tends to have butter sticky everywhere, if you use your hand.

A pair of disposable glove and a plastic spatula are both useful. You can use stand mixer too, as long as you accomplish the work.

All the best in making the egg tarts. This is the first time I try making this type of pastry and your instructions are really good and the cling film is so useful when folding!

I wanted to ask what size egg tart mold you use? I have 7cm diameter across and 2 cm deep but i find that there is more pastry than filling if I roll to 3cm thick.

I had a lot of left over egg batter which i steamed to make steam egg custard!! Hi Elkie, Thanks for trying out the recipe.

Mine is probably about or slightly bigger than yours. You can make less of the filling if that is too much. It all depends on the size and depth for the mold for the egg tarts.

Hi KP, I was just wondering, would it still work if you do it like the western way in which the butter is not so liquid, and therefore easier to handle as well?

Could this be done like putting the oil dough into a square shape and doing it as puff pastry? Hi Francid, 1. You can make it into a rectangle which still works the same.

Pure butter is used to make western puff pastry. Butter or shortening plus some flour is used to make the Chinese style puff pastry.

That is why the taste is not the same. It will be the western type is you use the solid butter pieces and lay on the roll out water dough and start to fold it.

Hi KP, i meant, could I use the same method as for the western puff pastry but use the same ingredients as this one. Cos when i made this at home, the inside took very long to firm up.

Hi KP, i mean, like making the cross and putting the oil dough in the center and folding the four corners toward the center.

Hi Francid, You can use the western method as mentioned, i. The outcome will be identical. Hi KP, Do i bake in a fan generated oven or without the fan, and which position do i place the egg tarts in the oven?

I am using the gas oven without a fan, which turns out well. I put them right at the center. Not quite sure about the fan oven since I do not have one.

Hi KP, I made these today in a no fan oven at the bottom rack, do you have any idea why there would be a hollow in the center of the egg custard filling?

I am kind of baffled with what you got too. I have not encountered a hollow if I understand correctly, there is a hole in the custard.

So I am making a wild guess that it may be caused by the temperature is too high. I think high heat is important initially to cook the pastry but reduce the heat after 15 minutes and reduce further to cook the custard so that the custard will not expand too much and then deflate later.

I am making these egg tarts for the first time and I find that my dough keeps breaking and the oil dough keeps getting exposed. I am going as gently as possible — and when I roll the cold dough it begins to crack.

Hi Wen, You are facing a problem that many people are having too. Here is my suggestion: 1. Cracking usually means there is not enough water.

I can only say that the amount of water in the recipe is the guideline. As long as the dough does to turn into a sticky mass. Be patient. It is always chill it until firmer than you think.

The pastry can be frozen, so that is no problem. How firm the best for folding? I would say it is frim enough that you can bend the pastry without breaking it.

Once you think the butter starts to soften and you believe it may leak out when your roll, send it back to the chiller or freezer.

If you do it during winter than it should have not a problem, but during summer, or in a tropical country like me, you have to get all things ready and do it fast.

If it breaks, add plenty of flour on the breaking point. Keep rolling as usual. After that, using a brush to brush off the excess flour before folding it.

Thank you for sharing such a thoughtful recipe on traditional Hong Kong egg tarts! I just have one question:.

When the water dough is rolled out prior to adding the oil dough. Approximately what dimensions should this be? Hi Amanda, Sorry for the late reply.

We are now in a holiday mood and Chinese New Year is a long break : I never actually measure the size of the water dough so I cannot give you the exact dimension.

However, I have some suggestions that may be useful to you. Just imagine you need that size to wrap up the oil dough. If you think the oil is going to leak, just put back to the refrigerator and wait until it firms up.

This is my first time doing it. Do I need to blind bake the tart dough first before pouring the filing? If need to what is the temperate and duration to bake?

Or I can just pour the filling straight to the tart dough? Hi Eunice, I normally do not blind bake the tart. As long as your oven is at the right temperature, it should be fine.

Also, do not fill the tart pastry with too much filling. It will expand a bit during baking and if it spills, the egg will stick to the mold and make it very hard to remove it.

It seems that the puff pastry i made wasnt properly cooked until inside so its not flakey. This happens especially at the bottom section.

The top parts which was baked properly was flakey. Upper and lower heat with circulating air. I could show you the photo i took but wasnt sure how to attached it.

Try the followings: 1. Put the egg tart at the lowest rack, so that it is closest to the lower heat source of the oven.

Adjust the temperature of the bottom heat ten to twenty degree higher than the top heat. If possible, turn off the circulating air so that the lower section of the oven is hotter than the top part.

By doing so, the bottom part of the pastry will cook faster than the edges and the top and will be less soggy. Do you have the measurements in cups?

My recipe uses whole eggs. There is no need to separate the yolk from the white. One of my readers asked a question about separating the yolk and white in the comment section, and that is why you spot it.

I just wanted to clarify uh its mL right? That makes all the measurement with the highest accuracy. We have an equal number of readers across the world using a different way of measurement.

Please bear with me at this moment until I get an auto converter to be used in my blog. Hi Kwan, Thanks for sharing such a great recipe I wanted to ask how can I stop the filling becoming like scrambled egg once cooked?

Thanks Sonal. Hi Sonal, Try this; 1. Use lower heat to steam. Shorten the time of steaming. I just baked the egg tart today.

The tart shells were crispy and felt like puff but it does have layers. Is it because I press the dough to much on to tart shells? And my egg custard expand in the oven and shrink back after I bring it out but I did leave the door ajar.

Dunno what went wrong. Hi Tracey, You mentioned the pastry does have layers so it should be fine. For the egg filling, it may be due to the top temperature is too high.

Try to reduce only the top temperature of the oven. It looks like it is too hot. The temperature in the recipe is for reference, but there is a significant variation between different ovens.

I hope this is useful. Hello, can you tell me what other fillings I can use other than egg custard? This pastry seems to be very versatile, can I put savory fillings in it?

Sure, you can. Just think of the filling for the western style puff pastry and shortcrust pastry. You can put anything inside, or use it to make a turnover of puff.

As you said, it is very versatile. Hi Hartini, Any brand should be fine, but I suggest unsalted butter.

You can use this to calculate how much you need. Hi i tried to male this egg tart using this recipe, the oil dough is leaking n meesy.

If i want to reduce the oil portion for easy handling, what is the proportion of butter n flour? I m wondering whether same as cake flour or medium protein flour?

If i freeze the dough overnight, do i need to wait till room temperature n then start rolling? Another way is to substitute the plain flour which I mean is the normal cake flour or all-purpose flour with half of the bread flour which has a higher protein content.

This way will yield a more elastic dough, so when you roll it out, it will not break that easy. Thanks for ur response you mentioned that we can subtitute half of plain flour medium protein flour into bread flour high protein flour?

Is it only for water dough or both dough? It is only for the outer dough, which means the water dough. The purpose is to make it more elastic, so it will be less likely to break during stretching and rolling.

It is your preference to use either whole egg or yolk alone. I use the whole egg normally and go through a strainer to remove the uneven egg white.

For butter, is it salted or unsalted 3. For egg, is it whole egg or only egg yolk for the filling 4. For rolling, shd i freeze the dough or chill it only?

And if i freeze it overnight , do i need to let it at room temperature before rolling. I have just replied to most of the questions. Just some additional though you do not reduce the oil though.

Keep it cold so that it is easy to handle. Also, knead the water dough a little longer and substitute part of it with bread flour help to make it more elastic and fewer chances to leak.

Hi Jennifer, That is what I mean. Roll out the water dough to form a sheet, then put the oil dough at the center, then wrap up the oil dough by using the sheet of the water dough.

Hi KP: Just grateful for the excellent video and recipe. I followed step by step your recipe and very good result.

Thank you very much for sharing it. Regards, Elsa Lock. Hi Elsa, Thank you for trying out the recipe. I hope you enjoy the egg tarts, and it is my pleasure to share.

Thanks you very much! My f amily, friends and I enjoyed it. In my country ,Peru, they are very expensive to buy and avalaible only in Chinatown.

Very happy now in my Homemade album. Regards, Elsa. Hi Elsa, Really happy to know that my Chinese egg tarts recipe is useful to you, and your friends and family love it.

Hi KP: Thank you for the detailed recipe! I am going to try and make it this weekend but had a question — do you put the tart molds on a baking sheet when you put it in the oven?

Or just put the tart mold directly on the wire rack in the oven — not sure if it makes a difference! Hi Peng, I put it into the oven directly, no baking sheet.

I think it will not make much difference. Hi KP, Thanks for the detailed recipe! I do not have any tart molds.

Can I make egg tarts in a muffin tray or silicon cupcake molds? Hi Lydia, I have not tried to use muffin try but it should work, although the shape may not look like those in the Chinese dim sum store.

Hi KP, This recipe looks amazing! Hope you can help! Hi Tracy, There is always a challenge to make the layered pastry, and once you succeed, you will be overjoyed!

So please keep trying. Type of flour used. If that is the case, look for low gluten flour those call cake flour or pastry flour.

Do not use bread flour or high gluten flour. Too little water. Try to increase the amount of water. If the water dough is too dry, it can behave like a rubber bouncy.

The amount of water required depends on the type of flour. Therefore the quantity of water in the recipe can only be used as a general guide.

Rest before folding. Since you have rest the dough for 45 minutes before rolling out, I think this is not the reason. That is all I can think of for now.

I hope this information is useful to you. Best regards, KP Kwan. Thanks for the quick reply! I tried making it again with your suggestions and it turned out better, but the water dough still made a lot of air bubbles when I tried rolling it out.

Hi Kwan, I am lactose intolerant n is it possible to replace butter with lard mix with cooking oil? I think lard would enhance the flavor a little and mixing with cooking oil is to use lesser lard.

The milk in the egg filings can replace with water? Kindly advise if these substitutes work? I seldom hands on pastry as majority of them are buttery flavoured, for Chinese egg tarts I want to give it a try.

Hi Chan, 1. Lard is used in making Chinese egg tarts traditionally and can substitute the butter. In fact, lard will give a better layer than butter for the pastry.

The reason I use butter in the recipe is that butter is universal around the world, and is healthier. I know that some old school Dim Sum restaurants still use lard, but has gradually shifted to butter and other oil during the demand from customers.

You may just use water as a substitute for milk. I am not sure whether soy milk is a good substitute, but you can give it a try. Hi Theresa, Thanks so much for trying my recipe.

I am glad to know that it works, and everyone enjoys it. Our email address is info tasteasianfood. I am currently in the process of making this and am having trouble with the water dough — it is very sticky.

I am mixing by hand because I do not have a food processor. Could you please advise what to do? Hi Vivian, It is messy to mix by hand, and that is why I use an electric mixer.

I do have a suggestion. Place the flour and water in a large plastic container and mix it with a silicone spatula.

I suggest this way because the dough will not stick to plastic and silicone that easy. I tried to make the egg tarts, but if I follow the recipe it looks like I have more oil dough than you in the video.

Should I really put all the oilbsough in top? Hi KL, Thank you for trying the recipe. You may not need to use all the oil dough if you find that it is too much and tends to leak out.

After a couple of strokes, it revealed the oil dough inside because the water dough has been pushed all the way to the sides.

Note: I might have put it too long in the freezer, around mins Hence, when I folded the dough mixture, the oil dough cracked and I end up with broken pieces of oil dough all over my water dough.

Thanks for your help. Hi Jennifer, This problem is commonly happening. The oil dough will harden faster than the water dough because oil solidifies much quicker.

Try this: 1. Keep in the chiller instead, which is four degrees Celcius instead of the freezer, which is negative 16 degrees celsius.

If it is too hard you should feel by your hand , wait for a while before rolling, or put your palm on the dough to warm it. The crack dough can still be used, albeit it is not as good.

I just baked the tarts and the outer skin of some of the tarts look like fried wonton skin. Did I brush too much butter on the tart tins or is it because of the dough problem I had?

Hi Jennifer, Not sure the exact problem. I am just guessing. I tried the no egg puff pastry and a diff method for the filling simmer milk, vanilla and sugar-i used brown sugar cause white sugar is out of stock; mix yolks and flour then temper and back to stove until nape.

The result is okay but the inner layer of puff pastry is too soft but the outer achieved the flakiness. Is it because of the eggless puff pastry?

Or because of the method of the filling i did? Hope to hear from you soon! Hi Sam, I think it may not be due to the filling.

If you have an oven that can adjust the bottom temperature separately, increase the bottom temperature so that it can puff up faster.

The dough, however, can be stored in the freezer for a few weeks. Thanks for your explanation. I have tried baking the tarts but I found that the base was still undercooked when the egg was cooked.

I have started blind baking to see if this works better. How long do you suggest I cook the egg for if I blind bake my pastry?

I suggest to blind bake for ten minutes. Prick some holes on the bottom of the pastry with the tyne of the fork. And if possible, put something e.

Thanks for sharing the recipe! Just wanted to clarify, so if I was using unsalted butter in my oil dough, then I have to use 3.

What size eggs do you use? Also, if I use a stand mixer, which attachment should I use? The flat beater or the dough hook attachment is better?

How many times ideally should u roll out the dough before using? Does it make any difference if you do too little or too many times? Hi Maryanna, Here are my answers: 1.

The egg I use is about 50g each weight is without the shell 3. If I use the hand mixer, I will choose the flat beater. You need to fold and roll out at least three times, and four is better.

If you do it more than four, the layer will become too thin and break, which will have a negative effect. Hi Mary, Please refer to my earlier reply.

So not stress out too much of that 3g of butter. I seldom go wrong. Thanks for the reply. Hi Mary, I make it easy for you.

If the percentage confuses you- just follow the recipe, i. I hope it is clear and enjoy your baking. I made these yesterday and they were delicious.

The egg custard was perfect and pastry layered and crunchy. I sent a photo to my dad and he said he was very proud LOL.

Hi Debbie, That is wonderful news. Hi Mr Kwan, Can I substitute the water to milk, maybe add some evaporated milk? Will that works?

Hi Manda, You can use all milk and no water. I use only milk in the Portuguese tart recipe. Thank you for sharing this piece of recipe. I have followed your recipe by using good quality salted butter.

Is there something that can help to enhance the taste? HI Eelynn, There is always room to improve and will be glad to find ways.

Meanwhile, you may want to use lard instead of butter. That was what most people do in the past, and now getting lesser due to health reasons.

It tastes much better. Best regards. Thx KP Kwan for sharing yr recipe. Everytging went well except for the cooked fillinh..

Just guessing, can it be some bubbles? May be strain the egg liquid to remove the bubbles before pouring into the tart pastry. I want to say thank you so much for the recipe.

I have tried several egg tart recipes and nothing was as authentic as yours. I did have one question. What happens if the oil dough leaks? How will the leak change the result of the egg tart?

Hi Nancy, If the oil dough leaks, the layer will not be well defined. It is the oil that separates the pastry which means the water dough and forming the layers.

Hi, will be attempting your recipe tomorrow. Would like to ask few questions 1 saw other recipe using custard powder. Does it make a difference?

Is this step needed? Or it depends on your dough? Hi Hebrew, 1. Custard powder is made of cornstarch and egg flavor and coloring. The primary purpose is to provide additional egg flavor, yellow color, and thicken the custard.

If you use it, the custard is firmer, more yellow with extra artificial egg flavor. The decision depends entirely on the individual. The purpose of putting the pastry back to the refrigerator after each fold is to let it become harder before the next fold.

Therefore, it depends on the room temperature winter or summer and also the initial firmness of the paste when you roll it out.

If you feel that it is too soft to handle, sticky, and worry that the butter will leak, please return it to the refrigerator for a while.

I hope this information is useful and all the best in baking. Thank you for sharing your recipes with me! I followed your recipe exactly and they turned out great.

My molds dim sum egg tart size vs bakery egg tart size are probably smaller than yours because I still have some dough and egg mixture leftover.

Egg tarts are one of my favorite Chinese desserts. I will definitely makethem again!!! Hi Karen, I am delighted it was a success, and more importantly, it makes your kids happy!

Hi Cindy, A possible reason is the filling leak out from the pastry, either it is too full, or from the base. You can test if this is the reason by blind baking one without the egg filling.

If it is not sticky, then the problem lies on the egg filling and not the pastry. Hi Kim, You can leave it in the fridge.

Some people make it way in advance and can keep it in the freezer for a longer time. Hi KP, Thank you for your prompt reply.

Wish me good luck! My sister and I made your egg tarts yesterday and they are sooooo good!!! So many flaky layers!!! Hi Nancy, I am delighted to know that the recipe works.

I will take a look at the image shortly. Hi Sam, If you do not have a food processor, you can use an electric hand mixer, which will yield the same result.

If you are referring to the manual hand beater not electric , then I suggest you put all the ingredients in a large bowl. Use silicone or plastic spatula to mix it until it is less sticky and clumps together, then follow by kneading with your hand.

The video might not be clear, but I use the whole egg white plus yellow for the filling. Hi, this egg tart was just a little too salty.

Besides that, the crust was very flaky like in dim sum restaurants and the egg filling tasted amazing! Thank you very much for the detailed instructions and video!

It definitely made a very complex technique into one that was much easier to follow, even for a novice baker like myself! If you have a chance to reply, I would greatly appreciate it!

Thank you and I plan to check out more of your YouTube videos! Hi Lee, Thank you for reaching out. I have checked the recipe, and the amount of flout in the oil dough is g.

The recipe has been amended. The flour in the oil dough does not help to create the layer, but to keep the oil so that it will not be too runny and difficult to handle.

Therefore, g is enough. I hope you will have a successful baking session. Hi there, I have to try your recipe.

Have you ever had an issue with a rubber like layer between the egg and crust before? Hi Sandy, I have not encountered such an issue.

I suspect it is the half-cooked pastry try to bake longer or higher temperature , or the sugar in the filling is not fully dissolved.

I accept the Privacy Policy. Skip to content. Jump to Recipe. Continue to Content. Prep Time 4 hours. Cook Time 25 minutes. Total Time 4 hours 25 minutes.

Instructions Oil dough Cut the chilled butter into small pieces. Put the butter and flour in an electric food processor.

Use the pulse function to mix them until it forms bridges and strands. Remove it from the electric food processor, scoop out the oil dough with a metal spoon and place it on the water dough.

Wrap it in cling film, place it in the chiller for 20 minutes, or until it becomes firm. Water dough Put the plain flour, egg, and ice water in the electric food processor.

Mix them until they combine and form a ball. Prepare the pastry Spread a large piece of cling film on the tabletop, sprinkle with some plain flour.

Flatten the water dough and place another piece of cling film on top. Roll the water dough to form a large square. Remove the cling film on top of the water dough, place the oil dough in the center and fold the sides of the water dough over the oil dough.

Make sure the oil dough is fully covered by the water dough. Flatten it with a rolling pin. Analogy: Now the dough looks like a sandwich, with the oil dough mirrors the filling of the sandwich, and the water dough mirrors the bread.

Wrap it in cling film and leave it in the chiller for twenty minutes or until it hardens. Remove it from the chiller Flatten it with a rolling pin to about 3cm thick.

Fold both ends of the dough toward the center like closing a book. Analogy: Now it resembles a multilayered sandwich.

Place it into the chiller again for 20 minutes. Repeat the folding process step 6 for three more times. After the last repetition, flatten the dough to about 3mm thickness.

Use a cookies cutter or bowl to cut out pieces of round pastry which are slightly larger than the area of the mold. Put the cut pastry into a mold.

Lightly press the pastry onto the surface of the mold. Trim the sides with a fork or a blunt knife. Filling Melt the sugar with water to make a simple syrup.

Let it cool. Beat the eggs for a minute. Add the milk and syrup to the egg. Mixed well. Filter the milk liquid twice to remove impurities.

Leave the oven door ajar for five minutes then remove the egg tarts. Recommended Products As an Amazon Associate and member of other affiliate programs, I earn from qualifying purchases.

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KP Kwan June 2, KP Kwan December 15, Hi Christy, You can bake the chilled or even frozen moulded shells for the egg tarts in the oven, without letting them warm up until they are back to the room temperature.

KP Kwan Reply. Josie March 18, Will that greatly affect my Outcome or should I redo my pastry Reply. KP Kwan March 19, Lucyana April 18, Hi KP, I want to asked, can I used mixer or hand mix to mix the water dough and oil dough?

Lucy Reply. KP Kwan April 19, Jennifer July 10, Whats the prob if the tarts filling pop up like a half ball Reply. KP Kwan July 10, Anne July 30, KP Kwan July 30, VS Tan October 8, Thanks again!

KP Kwan October 8, Andy Cheung June 14, This looks wonderful! Have you considered making a video on YouTube?

KP Kwan June 14, Mary Lena June 26, KP Kwan June 26, No worries. That is optional. LP September 23, KP Kwan September 23, Thanks, KP Kwan Reply.

MF November 2, KP Kwan November 2, SW November 5, KP Kwan November 5, Ferris November 6, Many thanks!

KP Kwan November 6, Thank you so much! Really look forward for your advice. Dear Ferris, It seems the problem is not due to overheating or high temperature.

Ferris November 7, Dear KP, I forgot to tell you that I blind bake first my tart shells before adding the egg custard. KP Kwan November 7, Dear Ferris, I follow your recipes and replicate it, and this is the result.

Hope this helps. Francid November 23, KP Kwan November 23, Dear Francid, I get your questions, and I am trying to explain as clear as possible.

Best regards, KP Kwan Reply. Francid December 14, Thank you, Francid Reply. Hi Francid, You can mix the oil dough with a metal spoon if you opt not to use an electric food processor.

Yours, Francid Reply. Hi Francid, You can stack up the leftover pastry carefully just like stacking up pieces of papers. Francid December 15, Thank you again.

Hi Francid, You need to treat it gently so the oil will not squeeze out. Hi KP, I would also like to ask what do you do with the egg white.

Patty December 21, Hi KP, Just wanted to thank you for posting egg tart recipe with such great details. KP Kwan December 21, Thank you Patty.

Hope you make a batch of delicious egg tarts soon. KP kwan Reply. Felicia December 28, If so, could you please direct me as to how to make these in the microwave Reply.

KP Kwan December 28, Dear Felicia, I have not made egg tarts with the microwave oven. Dear Felicia, Every oven will give you a different result.

Novi January 11, KP Kwan January 11, Dear Novi, I have a simple suggestion for you. You may also want to prepare the egg fillings a days before and keep it in the chiller.

Ann January 13, Thank you for this detailed instruction on how to do egg tart! It is very helpful. KP Kwan January 13, Hi Ann, Thanks for following my recipe.

Thi February 9, Sincerely, Thi Reply. KP Kwan February 9, Dear Thi, In making western puff pastry, we use the water dough to wrap the pure butter instead of combined with flour as for the Chinese version.

Hi KP, Thank you for the clear and detailed instructions. Thank you, Beth Reply. Hi Beth, You can use another type of oil margarine, shortening or animal fats instead of butter.

Crunchyyyyyy March 5, Hi KP, Could I exchange the milk with water. Crunchyyyyyy Reply. KP Kwan March 5, Hi Crunchyyyyyy, Just use the same amount of milk to substitute the water will do.

Hi Crunchyyyyyy, No butter please. Keep it simple. Water is OK as I mentioned just now. Karen March 15, KP Kwan March 15, Vika March 24, KP Kwan March 24, Pineapple Buns, a beloved Chinese bakery treat!

Fragrant, buttery, melt-in-your-mouth pineapple tarts are even more delicious when made with home-made pineapple jam filling and the perfect sweet shortcrust pastry dough.

This recipe for pineapple buns is so easy and authentic, you'll be making this Chinese bakery classic at home in no time.

No specialty ingredients involved! In a food processor, pulse the flour, salt and butter until they resemble bread crumbs.

With the motor running, add the yolk-water mixture and process until the dough starts to come together. Pour out the contents and gently knead the dough to form a ball.

Flatten and wrap in clingwrap. Rest it…. Recipe: Pineapple jam 4 pineapples 2 cinnamon stick 2 star anise 6 cloves g sugar or more to taste 1.

Peel and core pineapples.

Asian Tarts - Stöbern in Kategorien

EUR 16, Dabei ist Tapioka in Asien längst fester Bestandteil zahlreicher Süssspeisen. Evonne and Sarah reveal their secret to making the light, buttery and crisp shortcrust pastry that you have always dreamed of and you can be assured that every recipe in here has been tested for success and comes with advice and tips specifically for that pie. James Bruce empfiehlt Eck Bakery. Schreiben Sie die erste Rezension Über dieses Produkt. Food Fact: Balsambirne aka Bittermelone. Das könnte Ihnen auch gefallen.